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20131028
20131105
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has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home? at first glance this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power. the great power gap between the united states and other countries even rich european ones. the most illuminating response came from the former foreign minister of france. he said in a radio interview, let's be honest we eavesdrop too. everyone is listening to everyone else. he went on to add we don't have the same means as the united states which makes us jealous. america spends tens of billions of dollars on intelligence collection. it's hard to get data to make good comparisons but it is safe to assume that washington's intelligence budget dwarfs that of other countries just as it does with defense spending. it is particularly strange that this rift should develop between the united states and its closest allies in europe. it was predictable and in fact in a sense predicted. in 2002, the british diplomat robert cooper wrote an
of the obama administration's handling of the region, the last measure of american foreign policy should be how it is received by the house. if there were a price for most irresponsible foreign policy, it would be surely be awarded to saudi arabia. it is the nation most responsible for the rise of islamic radicalism and militancy across the world. over the past four decades, the kingdoms immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme intolerant and violent version of islam. go anywhere in the world from germany to indonesia and you will find islamic centers flush with saudi money spouting intolerance and hate. a top treasury official said -- >> if i could snap my fingers and cut off funding from one country, it would be saudi arabia. >> hillary clinton confirmed that saudi arabia remained a critical financial base for terrorism. she also said that there was only limited action to stop flow of funds from taliban and other such terrorists groups. saudi arabia was one of three countries in the world to recognize and support the taliban-led government in afghanistan until t
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